Monday, March 20, 2017

Algae Aquarium Garden


Dailymotion:

March 12th, 2017
It is freezing cold in Central park, NY.
Last night, the temperature dropped to 25 degrees Fahrenheit.
You can see snow on the left.

 Some rocks covered with ice along the spring.
 Running water does not freeze easily.

 What water plants may survive in freezing water?

 This one!
 Filamentous Algae known as pond scum.
 One can find it in ponds, lakes, and rivers - never at pet stores!

Let's get some samples.
 Fill up an empty and clean bottle with a sample of water.

 Get a long stick.

Use a stick to pull out a water plant.

Place the plant in the water bottle.


 Wild plants must be kept isolated in a separate (test) aquarium for observation.
 In a warmer time of the year, wild plants come with different types of creatures - many of them are beneficial, but some are harmful!




Check my previous videos to see some of the creatures.
There could be nymphs, larvae, or eggs attached to the plant.
You may want to separate it before setting the plant in your regular aquarium.
I've been growing filamentous algae in my aquariums since Summer 2016.

It grows as algae does - without any help on my part.
 It grows persistently, even during short winter days.
 In my observations, it flourishes in nitrate (fish poop) and when exposed to sunlight.

It grows incredibly fast and can clog water filters.




 The filamentous algae is much larger than common microscopic algae.
 It makes it easy to physically remove any excess of filamentous algae from an aquarium.







 It grows in the shape of fuzzy green cloud.




Here you can take a closer look at it.
A cluster of green hair.
It easily tangles between rocks, roots, and leaves of other plants.


 It is a home and a hiding place for microscopic creatures and baby fish.
 I want it in my aquariums for that reason.

 It makes a tasty snack for my guppies.

 Have fun and happy aquarium :) 

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